CAPITAL COERCION AND CRIME BOSSISM IN THE PHILIPPINES PDF

Philippines. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by. John T. Sidel. California: Stanford University Press, xii + US$, cloth. Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Bossism in the Philippines, by John T. Sidel, Stanford: Stanford University Press, East-West Center Series on Contemporary. Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local.

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Without acknowledging the local cultural context in which a state apparatus operates, the explanatory power of any political theory will be severely limited. Skip to search Skip to main content. This book focuses on local bossism, a common political phenomenon where local power brokers achieve monopolistic control over an area’s coercive and economic resources. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition bosdism social relations.

Stanford University Press- Political Science – pages. Click here to sign up. Eric Tagliacozzo Limited preview – Portrayals of a “weak state” captured by a landed oligarchy have similarly neglected the enduring institutional legacies of Philippibes colonial rule and the importance of state resources for the accumulation of wealth and power in the Philippines.

Social Science Research on Sout heast A sia 5: Capital, coercion, and crime: In sum, Capital, Coercion, and Crime provides a comparative historical analysis of bossism, drawing conclusions of great interest not only to scholars of Southeast Asia but to students of comparative politics as well. The body of the text is devoted to the development of diverse and locally specific forms of bossism in the provinces of Cavite and Cebu.

Sidel has written a superb and pioneering analysis that defines the future course for studies of local elites—not only in the Philippines but elsewhere as well.

Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development. Agrarian Conflict in 20th-Century Luzon.

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Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines

The small-town dynasties of Cebu– 5. Examples of wnd include Old Corruption in eighteenth-century England, urban political machines in the United States, caciques in Latin America, the Mafia in Southern Italy, and today’s gangster politicians in such countries as India, Russia, and Thailand.

This is because bossism both relies upon and reinforces the deplorable status quo in terms of widespread poverty, inequality, landlessness, lawlessness, and other socio-economic ills. The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu. The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu.

For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. The DistrictLevel Dynasties of Cebu. Yet writings capihal Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the role of coercion in shaping electoral competition and social relations. The book elaborates these arguments through case studies of bosses in two Philippine provinces, Cavite and Cebu.

Capital, coercion, and crime: bossism in the Philippines – LSE Research Online

Philippinse essentially means that elected officials acquired broad discretionary powers over all local resources law enforcement, taxes, local appointments, etc.

My library Help Advanced Book Search. In other words, the system is not broken — rather, it is a runaway success. Bossism in Comparative Perspective. For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism.

And though he does not mention it explicitly, Sidel is obviously troubled by this phenomenon, as are most Filipinos thhe home and abroad. Hutchcroft, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Comparisons between bosses over successive historical periods highlight the gradual transformation of bossism through capitalist development. In fact, when bossism in other countries is considered, the key culprit seems to be, not a particular structural flaw in the development of national institutions, but electoral democracy itself.

In the case of the Philippines, it is clear that certain cultural factors configure social and political relations between bosses and their supporters, as well as within a given network of bosses. These contradictions have encouraged bossism in the Philippines, as well as in other countries. The author argues that the roots of bossism in the Philippines lie in the inauguration philippinex formal democratic institutions at a relatively early stage of capitalist development.

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Local bossism flourished in Burma during the early postindependence period of parliamentary rule, but faded at least in Burma proper with the imposition of centralized military rule in Secret Trades, Porous Borders: This leads to questions regarding the inevitability of bossism — because it is difficult to imagine a state with an electoral democracy that does not, in some way, place state resources in the hands of competitively elected officials.

Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Nielsen Book Data It builds on, while going significantly beyond, what other scholars have done and lays out a reasoned argument that future scholarship will have to engage about how public offices are won and lost and for whose benefit. Yet writings on Filipino political culture and patron-client relations have ignored the bosism of coercion phiippines shaping electoral competition and social relations.

Poverty and insecurity leave many voters vulnerable to clientelist, coercive, and financial pressure, and the state’s central role in capital accumulation provides the basis for local bosses’ economic empires and political machines.

Capital, Coercion, and Crime: Similarly, in early postindependence Indonesia, [ For many years, the entrenchment of numerous provincial warlords and political clans has made the Philippines a striking case of local bossism. Skip to main content. The SmallTown Dynasties of Cebu. Kerkvliet Limited preview –